More about CAPTCHAs

If you’re interested in following the advancement of tests intended to tell humans and computers apart, http://www.captcha.net is a good place to start. You will, for instance, learn that some more or less simple tests that involve reading characters dis…

If you’re interested in following the advancement of tests intended to tell humans and computers apart, www.captcha.net is a good place to start. You will, for instance, learn that some more or less simple tests that involve reading characters displayed as graphics, and entering these characters into forms, have been broken. Accredited registrars still use this kind of test, though, to protect Web access to their whois databases.The same people that are behind the CAPTCHA project are also behind the ESP game which is about describing pictures in text. It’s no coincidence that the latest captcha that they are beta-testing also involves describing images: Users are shown a collection of images, and they have to pick a word that describes what these images have in common. If that word matches, they pass, if it doesn’t match, you have failed the test.The problem with this test is that it requires an active command of written English, and that it is purely visual.(More notes on the accessibility problems with CAPTCHAs here.)

ALAC WHOIS policy proposal.

Here’s a policy proposal that ALAC just injected into WHOIS Task Forces one and two: Collect as little as possible, display even less. What is displayed goes into two tiers: A public one (with just the technical stuff) and an authenticated one (wh…

Here‘s a policy proposal that ALAC just injected into WHOIS Task Forces one and two: Collect as little as possible, display even less. What is displayed goes into two tiers: A public one (with just the technical stuff) and an authenticated one (where some personal data may go). Whoever wants to use the authenticated tier needs to identify themselves and their purpose. Purpose and identity of data users are made accessible to registrants.In response to other proposals that are floating around, we strongly recommend against a “shut down port 43, and do web interfaces with CAPTCHAs” approach,” and make some comments on the IP constituency’s call for more telephone numbers in WHOIS.

Centrino, the neverending story.

The random freezes after suspend/resume are still there, but Wi-Fi is getting better: The ndiswrapper problems have been fixed in the latest code revision of that module, so the Windows driver has become quite usable. (Although you can’t use it fo…

The random freezes after suspend/resume are still there, but Wi-Fi is getting better: The ndiswrapper problems have been fixed in the latest code revision of that module, so the Windows driver has become quite usable. (Although you can’t use it for any kind of serious wardriving activity.)

R40: X freezing after suspend/resume?

The R40 is still a pleasure to use, with one exception: Seems that the freezes I have observed before (and blamed on shaky wireless drivers) are related to the X server — or at least, that’s my culprit of the day. Freezes usually occur some time …

The R40 is still a pleasure to use, with one exception: Seems that the freezes I have observed before (and blamed on shaky wireless drivers) are related to the X server — or at least, that’s my culprit of the day. Freezes usually occur some time after a suspend/resume cycle, and I changed the pattern somewhat by removing gpm from the system and installing a new touchpad driver directly into X: Now, applications will be unresponsive, and the keyboard won’t react (no switching to a different console, but it’s still possible to turn on the keyboard light with Fn-F12); the mouse pointer can still be moved.On the positive side, the new synaptics driver is extremely nice — moving the finger along the right side of the touchpad, for instance, can be used for scrolling inside windows.I’m also playing around more with wireless drivers for the Centrino. There’s progress in fixing the ndiswrapper rmmod issue; also, the Intel driver works amazingly well — when I grumbled about it the other day, I had just experienced another frozen X server, and that pattern has now turned out to be independent of the wireless driver.

Centrino under Linux, part II

Turns out that Linux on the R40 isn’t entirely without problems: I finally got bitten by some pretty bad interactions between USB, suspend/resume, and my PCMCIA WLAN card (from SMC, with an Atmel chipset; there’s an open-source Linux driver for th…

Turns out that Linux on the R40 isn’t entirely without problems: I finally got bitten by some pretty bad interactions between USB, suspend/resume, and my PCMCIA WLAN card (from SMC, with an Atmel chipset; there’s an open-source Linux driver for this card). It helps greatly to use the built-in Wi-Fi instead. And, yes, that’s indeed possible if you are willing to use a Windows XP driver under Linux. Just install ndiswrapper, and the driver you got with Windows XP. And it just works.(Additionally it’s a good idea to disable USB before suspending the machine. /etc/sysconfig/apm-scripts/apmcontinue-pre here. That way, one can upload Photos without rebooting…)Later: Turns out that ndiswrapper is sticky the ugly way — removing the module leads to various kinds of crashes. And the Intel driver isn’t mature enough, either… Bad luck with wireless for the moment.