Apple: Feel-good security in the next Safari?

From Apple’s Tiger Preview – Safari RSS page: Safari protects your personal information on shared or public Macs when surfing the Web. Go ahead and check your bank account and .Mac email at the library or shop for birthday presents on the family M…

From Apple’s Tiger Preview – Safari RSS page:

Safari protects your personal information on shared or public Macs when surfing the Web. Go ahead and check your bank account and .Mac email at the library or shop for birthday presents on the family Mac. Using Safari痴 new privacy feature, no information about where you visit on the Web, personal information you enter or pages you visit are saved or cached. It痴 as if you were never there.

Who guarantees that the Safari you see on that public computer hasn’t been changed? Who guarantees that there are no programs which sniff the keyboard, and the screen? Who guarantees that no hidden cameras are hidden in strategic places?Privacy features in some particular piece of software don’t mean that software is running in a trustworthy environment. Suggesting that users perform sensitive activities (such as banking) in untrusted environments, using untrusted computers, is terribly bad advice.

Read this.

Read these blogs: Michael Froomkins’ discourse.net; Goldstein Howe’s SCOTUS blog (this item in particular). … and this dissent: Stevens in Rumsfeld v. Padilla. Executive detention of subversive citizens, like detention of enemy soldiers to keep …

Read these blogs: Michael Froomkins’ discourse.net; Goldstein Howe’s SCOTUS blog (this item in particular)…. and this dissent: Stevens in Rumsfeld v. Padilla.

Executive detention of subversive citizens, like detention of enemy soldiers to keep them off the battlefield, may sometimes be justified to prevent persons from launching or becoming missiles of destruction. It may not, however, be justified by the naked interest in using unlawful procedures to extract information. Incommunicado detention for months on end is such a procedure. Whether the information so procured is more or less reliable than that acquired by more extreme forms of torture is of no conse-quence. For if this Nation is to remain true to the ideals symbolized by its flag, it must not wield the tools of tyrants even to resist an assault by the forces of tyranny.

WHOIS and SPAM

The 2003 CDT spam report is often cited as evidence that WHOIS data mining is not really responsible for any significant amount of spam. In early May, I changed the contact e-mail address displayed in the WHOIS records of most of my domain names t…

The 2003 CDT spam report is often cited as evidence that WHOIS data mining is not really responsible for any significant amount of spam.In early May, I changed the contact e-mail address displayed in the WHOIS records of most of my domain names to a fresh address that is not being spam-filtered. For six weeks, the address did not receive spam. I almost forgot about it. Now, I’m getting daily spam at that address.Seems like the CDT report’s findings are outdated.

TF3, Open Call

WHOIS Task Force 3 (accuracy) had its (first? only?) open conference call. The call was intended to extend the reach of the ongoing public comment process. It wasn’t too successful at that. I believe I hogged the line for the most part of the call…

WHOIS Task Force 3 (accuracy) had its (first? only?) open conference call. The call was intended to extend the reach of the ongoing public comment process. It wasn’t too successful at that.I believe I hogged the line for the most part of the call, going through the individual “best practices” proposed in TF3’s preliminary report. In a nutshell, the proposed recommendations either don’t make sense, are harmful, or moot.

New gTLDs, or not?

The most interesting part of today’s GNSO Council call begins 98:30 minutes into the MP3 recording, and takes about 17 minutes. It’s on the agenda under “any other business”: new gTLDs. My notes are below the break; if something sounds wrong to yo…

The most interesting part of today’s GNSO Council call begins 98:30 minutes into the MP3 recording, and takes about 17 minutes. It’s on the agenda under “any other business”: new gTLDs.My notes are below the break; if something sounds wrong to you, go listen to the MP3 recording.

FC2 on Thinkpad: New kernel, less problems.

There’s a new kernel for Fedora Core 2, and it seems to take care of the IRDA problems I had previously. No more kernel re-building to move the serial driver into a module: Just make sure you do setserial /dev/ttyS1 uart none before attempting to …

There’s a new kernel for Fedora Core 2, and it seems to take care of the IRDA problems I had previously.No more kernel re-building to move the serial driver into a module: Just make sure you do

setserial /dev/ttyS1 uart none

before attempting to load the FIR driver, and everything should work fine.With the new kernel, the only remaining driver that needs to be taken care of separately is the one for the built-in Centrino Wi-Fi.