What Laptop should I buy?

I’ve started looking for a new laptop — that trusty old Dell is asking ever louder questions about retirement benefits and less travel. There are three key criteria: The machine must be robust. It must have a good and extremely robust keyboard, s…

I’ve started looking for a new laptop — that trusty old Dell is asking ever louder questions about retirement benefits and less travel.There are three key criteria: The machine must be robust. It must have a good and extremely robust keyboard, since I’m typing much and fast. And Linux must run on it. By “Linux must run on it”, I don’t just mean “Linux boots”, but rather “can be used as a daily Linux workhorse.” That includes well-working networking and Wi-Fi equipment (though continued use of the good old PCMCIA cards I use with the Dell is an option), and that also includes that the graphics adapter must be supported by X11 — including that external VGA plug I need to plug in a beamer now and then! (Bad past experience with the Dell.) I don’t care much about Megahertz numbers and the like — in terms of processing power, about anything that’s availabe now would do.I don’t think a new Dell is an option — I’ve made some bad experiences in terms of hardware robustness (including a mouse button breaking off just because it’s being used), and the keyboard is so worn off it’s torturing me daily (after two years of not being used by the original owner, and one and a half years of heavy use under my hands). Right now, an IBM Thinkpad looks tempting; maybe one of the R40 or R50 devices.Thoughts, experiences, recommendations?

TLD proposal X is a bad idea. So what?

On the IP list, Karl Auerbach explains why a TLD for “mobile content” is a bad idea, even though it’s backed by major industry players. Karl’s arguments are convincing. But whom could Karl convince? I hope he does not convince ICANN: Because it is…

On the IP list, Karl Auerbach explains why a TLD for “mobile content” is a bad idea, even though it’s backed by major industry players. Karl’s arguments are convincing.But whom could Karl convince? I hope he does not convince ICANN: Because it is not (or, rather, should not be) ICANN’s business to decide whether a TLD proposal is a good or a bad idea. ICANN’s task should be to enable bad proposals to fail in the marketplace.Question: What should ICANN do when a seemingly “good” idea and a “bad” idea compete for the same TLD string? Auction?

“Protest! This policy is illegitimate!”

… that’s the ALAC statement that Karl Auerbach suggests we make everywhere until we have all the regional organizations in place. I’m sure that this input would be appreciated. But I’m also sure that it would have precisely zero influence. The G…

… that’s the ALAC statement that Karl Auerbach suggests we make everywhere until we have all the regional organizations in place. I’m sure that this input would be appreciated. But I’m also sure that it would have precisely zero influence.The GNSO policy processes are not waiting until we can convince enough at-large structures to join ALAC and to provide some legitimacy. The processes are running. We have some ways to lobby participants and to provide some analysis from an individual user’s point of view. In my view, it would be entirely irresponsible not to make use of the — admittedly limited — possibilities we have.(Also, “we are involved there and there and there” is a much sexier — but maybe not sexy enough — marketing message than “with a lot of luck, we might have a chance to get involved there, but we haven’t tried yet, so we can’t tell you.”)

MUC: W-LAN as it shouldn’t be.

I’m now sitting at Munich airport, using Vodafone’s hot-spot here. 30 minutes Internet access cost me about 4 Euros (1,300 Star Alliance miles would have been the alternative — quite a price tag) — and several minutes for figuring out how to dea…

I’m now sitting at Munich airport, using Vodafone’s hot-spot here. 30 minutes Internet access cost me about 4 Euros (1,300 Star Alliance miles would have been the alternative — quite a price tag) — and several minutes for figuring out how to deal with the billing system that Vodafone put in place here. The system works by submitting credit card information through a web form, and then receiving a PIN through SMS on a mobile phone.For the customer, this system brings a large number of disadvantages over an open WLAN network; also, it’s unaccessible for anyone but subscribers of a few domestic mobile phone operators. What’s so difficult about providing free and open WLAN access as a commodity that just works when you neeed it?Later: It fits into the picture that the e-mail receipt arrives two days later and consists of a PDF file that’s tagged as plain text.

Bruce Tonkin, Jedi Master.

Bruce Tonkin’s GNSO report at the public forum was a masterpiece both in terms of public speaking and analysis. Tonkin starts by noting that litigation is moving decision-making to a different forum. It means decision-making mechanisms within ICAN…

Bruce Tonkin’s GNSO report at the public forum was a masterpiece both in terms of public speaking and analysis.Tonkin starts by noting that litigation is moving decision-making to a different forum. It means decision-making mechanisms within ICANN failed. Why did the Roman Empire fail? Watch some movies. Also: Star Wars. Jedi Council eliminated, hope that does not happen here. … Public input: Too little data, too much speaking. Registrar won best actor and best supporting actor awards at public forum. Don’t behave like used car dealers.WHOIS — try to collect actual data. No responses. Why not? Manager of public participation. Bring more actors for the awards, or analyze? Policy development and analysis: Less public speaking. More analysis. Need staff support with strong analytical and writing skills. Spend money now and properly resource the analysis and policy development — or spend money later; spend it in another decision-making process.Seek return of the Jedi to ICANN. What does that mean? Analysis skills. Too much public speaking skills.Decisions. Clear criteria. Measurable objectives. There have been decisions, but there are no success metrics. Clearly document basis for decisions, so they can stand up to a separate decision-making process outside of ICANN.Wait Listing Service. 2001 — issue first raised. 2002 — General Counsel, Names Council, Transfers TF analyses, Council resolution on WLS: Don’t implement. But no clear set of criteria established. Seeking to get these criteria in the new registry services process.Appeals.Implementation: Less public speaking. Not an extended appeal process. Little experience on this in ICANN. Get people in there who actually implement, not policy developers.Compliance — worth trying. Not in the used cars sales industry. Review outcomes. Define success metrics. Review. Look at new TLDs: Reviewing now, but no review criteria developed at time of implementation. Resource process from public import through to implementation up front instead of spending on litigation later.Hope ICANN survives, does not share fate of other empires. Finally, thanks to one of the Jedi: Elizabeth Porteneuve. Extended applause.

Reasons for registrar accreditation?

Elliot Noss at the microphone in Rome: Increase in registrar accreditation, but not showing up in marketing data. “Other reasons” for registrar accreditation? Twomey: There are incentives in the market that reward having more accreditation, relati…

Elliot Noss at the microphone in Rome: Increase in registrar accreditation, but not showing up in marketing data. “Other reasons” for registrar accreditation? Twomey: There are incentives in the market that reward having more accreditation, relating to the batch pool operations around dot-com etc. Cerf: Gaming the system?

Twomey on MOU and transfer of responsibility.

Paul Twomey is giving his report to the public forum in Rome, and just discussed the memorandum of understanding. He reports that there are statements from the highest levels in the US department of commerce that the US government believes that IC…

Paul Twomey is giving his report to the public forum in Rome, and just discussed the memorandum of understanding. He reports that there are statements from the highest levels in the US department of commerce that the US government believes that ICANN’s functions should be performed in a multi-stakeholder, private-sector body, and not by the US government, and that the USG would like to see the MoU concluded and the transfer of responsibility take place.

Rome tomorrow: Privacy law session.

The non-commercial users’ constituency has arranged a session on privacy laws and whois with Giovanni Buttarelli, secretary general of the Italian Data protection authority. The session will take place from 0930 until 1030 in Room Velazquez. (Note…

The non-commercial users’ constituency has arranged a session on privacy laws and whois with Giovanni Buttarelli, secretary general of the Italian Data protection authority. The session will take place from 0930 until 1030 in Room Velazquez.(Note the room change from earlier announcements!)

WHOIS Task Force #3: Accuracy.

WHOIS Task Force #3 is now holding its workshop. Bernard Turcotte is presenting on the verification mechanisms employed by CIRA, the .ca registry. My point in response to that, from the floor, is that by requiring “accurate” or at least plausible …

WHOIS Task Force #3 is now holding its workshop. Bernard Turcotte is presenting on the verification mechanisms employed by CIRA, the .ca registry. My point in response to that, from the floor, is that by requiring “accurate” or at least plausible contact information bad actors are being driven underground, and that there are then incentives for them to use the contact details of innocent third parties. Similar experience exists elsewhere: In the fields of money laundering, where we have identity theft, and in the spam area, where plausibility filters on readers’ inboxes have brought us “joe jobs” in which a third party’s e-mail address is being abused. And the crack-down on open e-mail relays has brought us the abuse of home computers hijacked by worms and viruses for sending out spam.It’s not inconsistent with this that .ca is not experiencing identity theft cases, as Turcotte reported in response to a follow-up question by Sarah Deutsch: As long as there are places where bad actors can register domain names without giving “accurate” contact information, it’s rational for a bad actor to simply go there, and not bother stealing someone else’s contact information.

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