I’m sorry, but…

From: majordomo@gnso.icann.org To: roessler@does-not-exist.org Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2004 05:52:54 -0700 Subject: Majordomo results — >>>> unsubscribe ga Succeeded.

From: majordomo@gnso.icann.org
To: roessler@does-not-exist.org
Date: Wed, 28 Apr 2004 05:52:54 -0700
Subject: Majordomo results

--

>>>> unsubscribe ga
Succeeded.

A CD player that can’t play “copy-protected” CDs is not defective.

Kristian K???ntopp points to an interesting decision of a court in Aachen, Germany. Plaintiff has bought a new car, including CD player, in 2002. The car’s CD player is unable to play copy-protected CDs. Plaintiff sues for abatement of purchase pric…

Kristian Kntopp points to an interesting decision of a court in Aachen, Germany.Plaintiff has bought a new car, including CD player, in 2002. The car’s CD player is unable to play copy-protected CDs. Plaintiff sues for abatement of purchase price, claiming that the CD player is defective, and for damages, claiming that he should have been notified about the player’s inability to play copy-protected CDs.The court finds that the CD player is not defective.Buyers of a new CD player can assume that a CD player is able to play Compact Discs that comply with the Philipps and Sony specifications. Buyers can’t assume that a CD player is able to play “any medium that resembles a Compact Disc.” The court doubts that copy-protected CDs can even be legitimately called “CD”.A different conclusion could be possible if the actual market for CDs consisted mostly of non-standard media. This is not the case: Less than 10% of all CDs sold in Germany between 2001 and 2003 were copy protected.Plaintiff also doesn’t get damages for lack of notice: Given the small portion of non-compliant CDs in the marketplace, playing copy-protected CDs can’t be considered the usual purpose of a CD player. Hence, vendors are not held to notify buyers that their compliant devices are unable to play certain (or all) non-compliant CD media.

700,000 WHOIS records for $199.95

From my spam box today: Facts Disc Price Blowout!! These guys offer (essentially) the zone files of .com/.net/.org/.edu plus alleged 700,000 WHOIS records for $199.95. That’s 0.03 cents per record.

From my spam box today: Facts Disc Price Blowout!!These guys offer (essentially) the zone files of .com/.net/.org/.edu plus alleged 700,000 WHOIS records for $199.95. That’s 0.03 cents per record.

How not to do electronic commerce

Today, (presumably) the second instance of Mahler’s Beethoven’s 9th arrived here. It’s the first one I ordered, also at Amazon marketplace. That particular merchant first sent a confirmation for the wrong CD, and — upon my complaint — notified m…

Today, (presumably) the second instance of Mahler’s Beethoven’s 9th arrived here. It’s the first one I ordered, also at Amazon marketplace. That particular merchant first sent a confirmation for the wrong CD, and — upon my complaint — notified me that the CD was not available; the money was returned. Two weeks later — I had now ordered elsewhere, and their delivery was underway –, I received a “status message”. I responded that I considered the contract voided by the merchant, and would return any delivery from them. No response.Today, a shipping confirmation was in my e-mail, and another CD in my physical mailbox. This particular merchant will now have to pay the return postage back to them.Oh, just in case you’re wondering: I’m talking about www.germanmusicexpress.com.

Classical ear-openers.

Susan Crawford has — in late February — blogged what must have been an ear-opener concerto: Slatkin conducted Mahler’s retouche of Beethoven’s 9th, and before that gave a lecture explaining the various versions of the symphony. I have now finall…

Susan Crawford has — in late February — blogged what must have been an ear-opener concerto: Slatkin conducted Mahler’s retouche of Beethoven’s 9th, and before that gave a lecture explaining the various versions of the symphony. I have now finally got hold of a recording of this particular variant of the 9th: Gerhard Samuel conducting the Cincinnati Philharmonia Orchestra; the recording is available from Centaur Records.It’s quite an interesting recording that demands more time and concentration — in particular since my mental image of the 9th is dominated by a 1963 Karajan recording of the symphony. But, as usual, the more versions of the music one has listened to, the more interesting it becomes to listen to any and all of them.Speaking of ear-opening interpretations, here are some more (almost random) recommendations: The excellent Rubinstein-Reiner interpretation of Brahms’ first piano concerto (available on CD); Edwin Fischer’s dark cadenzas in Mozart’s D minor piano concerto K 466 (I have not been able to track down a CD version of the HMV record with the Philharmonia orchestra that I have in mind); Furtw舅gler’s version of Schumann’s 4th with the Berlin Philharmonics (in particular the extremely slow beginning of the final movement is fascinating; this recording may be available on CD).

How not to do fraud reporting: eBay.

Trying to be a good network citizen, I tend to make sure that I report ongoing fraud attempts and phishing expeditions that make it into my inbox. Today, two messages posing as eBay, and trying to get eBay login information and credit card informa…

Trying to be a good network citizen, I tend to make sure that I report ongoing fraud attempts and phishing expeditions that make it into my inbox. Today, two messages posing as eBay, and trying to get eBay login information and credit card information; the server used runs on a DSL line in Latin America. The fake was obvious since I’m a member of eBay Germany (and they talk German to me, not English) — still, it’s a bad thing, others may fall for it, and (unlike myself) eBay has the incentives, means, and resources to make sure the proper investigations are launched, and measures are taken to shut this down.On to ebay.de we go. After about 5-10 pointless pages, a web form. The e-mail message and relevant log file entries are cut and pasted, the “submit” button is clicked — and then I’m just told that my message can’t be accepted.The only other means of contact: A 0900-* phone number at 59 Euro Cents per minute — and then, all you get is a pointer to <spoof (at) ebay.de>, by e-mail, after you have expensively spelt your e-mail address to the customer services representative.Why isn’t <spoof (at) ebay.de> featured prominently on their web site? Why are they bothering people with web forms when they have to forward the messages in question by e-mail anyway? Why do I have to spend several minutes on the phone before I get the necessary e-mail address? Why do I have to pay for that, at rates an order of magnitude more expensive than international calls?