Workshop day.

It’s workshop day in Rome today, and we’re through the new registry services session and WHOIS Task Force 1. The biggest news from the registry services session was a constituency statement submitted by the gTLD registries’ constituency. At the TF…

It’s workshop day in Rome today, and we’re through the new registry services session and WHOIS Task Force 1.The biggest news from the registry services session was a constituency statement submitted by the gTLD registries’ constituency. At the TF1 session, there was some interesting discussion about possible approaches for tiered access. It appears like the basic concept of having an anonymous tier and an authenticated tier of access with different data sets displayed in each is gaining some traction.

Registrars and NCUC discussing WHOIS and privacy laws.

The non-commercial constituency is visiting the registrars; the meeting is joined by George Papapavlou from the European Commission. Papapavlou tries to explain main legal conocepts that determine European approach to WHOIS. One of the task forces…

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The non-commercial constituency is visiting the registrars; the meeting is joined by George Papapavlou from the European Commission. Papapavlou tries to explain main legal conocepts that determine European approach to WHOIS. One of the task forces of GNSO has asked GAC some questions. Papapavlou will try to give replies in this meeting. Main starting point for European thinking on WHOIS: “What is the purpose of WHOIS?” Answer this question, then you can answer second question: “What data are we talking about?” In European legal framework, processing of personal data is possible for specific purpose. Once purpose has been defined, you know what data is relevant. Purpose of WHOIS is not really clear. Initial idea: Need contact data on specific domain names in case something gets wrong — reach technical contact point. If this is purpose of WHOIS, that’s good starting point.

No Anonymity or End-To-End in Rome.

I’m at the ICANN meetings in Rome, and it seems like this is a bad place for anonymity, and, for that matter, the end-to-end Internet. Not only do you have to present a photo ID when purchasing a pre-paid GSM card (+39-3394227447) — access to the…

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I’m at the ICANN meetings in Rome, and it seems like this is a bad place for anonymity, and, for that matter, the end-to-end Internet. Not only do you have to present a photo ID when purchasing a pre-paid GSM card (+39-3394227447) — access to the wireless network at the meeting is also designed to prevent anonymous access to communications from happening. Standard at ICANN meetings (delivered by organizers even in China and Tunisia) is open Wi-Fi, with routed IP addresses and fully transparent access. In Italy, we’re told, that can’t be provided because of some obscure law, so we get individual user IDs and passwords for logging into a 10.* network that’s hidden behind a NAT box and a couple of more or less transparent proxies that get into peoples’ way when, for instance, securely connecting to a home mail server, and inject silly service provider logos while surfing the web.Security scanning devices photo taken in Vatican yesterday, where airport-like screening is applied to visitors to St. Peter’s cathedral; more tourist photos here.Update, Monday morning: Network connectivity looks much more transparent now.

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