More about CAPTCHAs

If you’re interested in following the advancement of tests intended to tell humans and computers apart, http://www.captcha.net is a good place to start. You will, for instance, learn that some more or less simple tests that involve reading characters dis…

If you’re interested in following the advancement of tests intended to tell humans and computers apart, www.captcha.net is a good place to start. You will, for instance, learn that some more or less simple tests that involve reading characters displayed as graphics, and entering these characters into forms, have been broken. Accredited registrars still use this kind of test, though, to protect Web access to their whois databases.The same people that are behind the CAPTCHA project are also behind the ESP game which is about describing pictures in text. It’s no coincidence that the latest captcha that they are beta-testing also involves describing images: Users are shown a collection of images, and they have to pick a word that describes what these images have in common. If that word matches, they pass, if it doesn’t match, you have failed the test.The problem with this test is that it requires an active command of written English, and that it is purely visual.(More notes on the accessibility problems with CAPTCHAs here.)