How not to do fraud reporting: eBay.

Trying to be a good network citizen, I tend to make sure that I report ongoing fraud attempts and phishing expeditions that make it into my inbox. Today, two messages posing as eBay, and trying to get eBay login information and credit card informa…

Trying to be a good network citizen, I tend to make sure that I report ongoing fraud attempts and phishing expeditions that make it into my inbox. Today, two messages posing as eBay, and trying to get eBay login information and credit card information; the server used runs on a DSL line in Latin America. The fake was obvious since I’m a member of eBay Germany (and they talk German to me, not English) — still, it’s a bad thing, others may fall for it, and (unlike myself) eBay has the incentives, means, and resources to make sure the proper investigations are launched, and measures are taken to shut this down.On to ebay.de we go. After about 5-10 pointless pages, a web form. The e-mail message and relevant log file entries are cut and pasted, the “submit” button is clicked — and then I’m just told that my message can’t be accepted.The only other means of contact: A 0900-* phone number at 59 Euro Cents per minute — and then, all you get is a pointer to <spoof (at) ebay.de>, by e-mail, after you have expensively spelt your e-mail address to the customer services representative.Why isn’t <spoof (at) ebay.de> featured prominently on their web site? Why are they bothering people with web forms when they have to forward the messages in question by e-mail anyway? Why do I have to spend several minutes on the phone before I get the necessary e-mail address? Why do I have to pay for that, at rates an order of magnitude more expensive than international calls?