Luxembourg Wall Calendar, anyone?

So I was searching the net for a 2004 wall calendar featuring the old quarters and fortifications of Luxembourg city (UNESCO world heritage list entry here). Unfortunately, that doesn’t seem to be the mainstream taste in wall calendars, which appe…

So I was searching the net for a 2004 wall calendar featuring the old quarters and fortifications of Luxembourg city (UNESCO world heritage list entry here).Unfortunately, that doesn’t seem to be the mainstream taste in wall calendars, which appears to consist in Terriers, swimsuits, cats, more Terriers, even more Terriers, still more Terriers, yet more Terriers, and occasionally Spaniels, Pomeranians, other kinds of Terriers, Dachshunds, more swimsuits — and FDNY Firefighters.Any help in finding a non-swimsuit, non-firefighter, and non-cute-animal calendar featuring old Luxembourg would be welcome.

Lessig on WSIS and Europe

Writes Lawrence Lessig: The Europeans have traditionally been committed to deploying the internet in the least convenient and most expensive way possible. Sounds like a description of the official WiFi available at the latest CeBIT in Hannover. Ex…

Writes Lawrence Lessig: The Europeans have traditionally been committed to deploying the internet in the least convenient and most expensive way possible.Sounds like a description of the official WiFi available at the latest CeBIT in Hannover. Expensive, over-organized, and unusable.(Then again, the GPRS service I’m using when on the road, domestically, is reasonably affordable, easy to use, and stable.)

Andrew McLaughlin on Public Participation in ICANN

Andrew McLaughlin responds to Palfrey et al: In short, concluding that the ICANN experiement in public participation has been a failure because online public forums have been a failure is like saying that television has been a failure because Cop …

Andrew McLaughlin responds to Palfrey et al: In short, concluding that the ICANN experiement in public participation has been a failure because online public forums have been a failure is like saying that television has been a failure because Cop Rock was a failure.

Mueller on ICANN, WSIS, and the Making of Global Civil Society

Says Milton Mueller: You say, “act now, democratize later” and it sounds bad. But let me respond by asking: if you don’t act, how can you ever democratize? And are you saying that no one should act until and unless they are sure that their agenda …

Says Milton Mueller: You say, “act now, democratize later” and it sounds bad. But let me respond by asking: if you don’t act, how can you ever democratize? And are you saying that no one should act until and unless they are sure that their agenda and their organizations are perfectly representative? Seems like a recipe for paralysis.

ICC: A proposal for internet governance.

From the International Chamber of Commerce web site comes a proposal for internet governance, by Talal Abu-Ghazaleh: 1. Maintain the operational management of the internet under private sector leadership, driven by the dynamics of business. 2. Sup…

From the International Chamber of Commerce web site comes a proposal for internet governance, by Talal Abu-Ghazaleh:

1. Maintain the operational management of the internet under private sector leadership, driven by the dynamics of business.2. Support ICANN’s continued evolution, preserving private sector leadership while bolstering global legitimacy.3. Set up within the TF a Governance Commission to be chaired by the US permanently, with membership from ITU, WIPO, WEF, ICC, UNCTAD, in addition to one representative from each continent.4. Encourage the processes of International Domain Names implementation and Intellectual Property Rights protection.

(Thanks!)

WLAN at WSIS

Wireless Internet access comes with a price tag — if you want to use it at WSIS, where delegates discuss the digital divide. Compare that to ICANN meetings where free Wi-Fi is one of the standard deliverables for local organizers.

Wireless Internet access comes with a price tag — if you want to use it at WSIS, where delegates discuss the digital divide. Compare that to ICANN meetings where free Wi-Fi is one of the standard deliverables for local organizers.

Being responsive to governments’ needs?

Bret Fausett quotes David McGuire, and observes that, since the GAC is mostly operating in closed shop mode, it’s hard to assess the GAC’s effectivity. I wonder, though, if the criticism out there is really about the GAC’s effectivity, or about IC…

Bret Fausett quotes David McGuire, and observes that, since the GAC is mostly operating in closed shop mode, it’s hard to assess the GAC’s effectivity.I wonder, though, if the criticism out there is really about the GAC’s effectivity, or about ICANN’s fundamental design; if the criticism is about ICANN’s willingness, or if it is about ICANN’s abilities and about its usefulness as a tool for governments to regulate on the Internet.Christopher Wilkinson’s recent remarks hint towards the second interpretation, as does the ongoing work of looking at the WIPO2 recommendations (General Counsel’s briefing here), and their possible implementation: The GAC had recommended that ICANN implement WIPO’s recommendations to extend the UDRP to give special protection to the names and acronyms of intergovernmental organizations, and country names; it was also suggested that review of such UDRP decisions in national courts be replaced by de novo arbitration. Opposition against making these changes is essentially universal throughout the non-GAC part of the ICANN community. What the GAC is asking for, and what ICANN supposedly would have to do in order to be responsive to governments’ needs, is to somehow enact a substantial change to an established consensus policy against the community’s consensus, and without any review of the question whether the recommendations should be implemented at all.It’s not clear to me how this should be possible; indeed, if ICANN was able to implement this advice in the way the GAC suggests, that would be deeply troubling by itself.