Proposed FY 03/04 budget posted.

ICANN has posted its proposed budget for the fiscal year 2003/04. A rather notable change against the preliminary budget is a $ 90,000 increase in Board & Public Meeting to fund travel to ICANN Board meetings for the three members of the GNSO Coun…

ICANN has posted its proposed budget for the fiscal year 2003/04. A rather notable change against the preliminary budget is a $ 90,000 increase in Board & Public Meeting to fund travel to ICANN Board meetings for the three members of the GNSO Council and the five members of the ALAC selected by the Nominating Committee, as requested by the chair of the Nominating Committee. I think that this is a good decision.

Registrars as private police?

Writes Michael Palage on Nikomarketing.com (the guys offering 20 million WHOIS records for $ 199): If this registrant is found to be in violation of its registrant agreement I hope that TUCOWS would do the right thing and terminate this domain nam…

Writes Michael Palage on Nikomarketing.com (the guys offering 20 million WHOIS records for $ 199): If this registrant is found to be in violation of its registrant agreement I hope that TUCOWS would do the right thing and terminate this domain name service agreement.

On the one hand, I share Michael’s sentiment that something should be done against these guys. On the other hand, what he suggests amounts to getting registrars into the business of enforcing just about anybody’s real or perceived rights by shutting down registrations without even a court order, on the basis that registrants’ agreements state that to the best of the [their] knowledge and belief, neither this registration of a domain name NOR THE MANNER IN WHICH IT IS DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY USED infringes upon the legal rights of a third party” (emphasis added).

ALAC on gtld-com report

ALAC to GNSO: We continue to believe that ICANN should simply oversee development of a genuine competitive market for domain name services. Basing market entry on a minimal and objective no-harm evaluation is key to achieving this goal. While we u…

ALAC to GNSO: We continue to believe that ICANN should simply oversee development of a genuine competitive market for domain name services. Basing market entry on a minimal and objective no-harm evaluation is key to achieving this goal. While we understand the Council’s desire to give more than a one-word answer, parts of the current expanded answer lean toward regulating this nascent market more than seems desirable. The message contains comments on a number of the criteria proposed in Philip Sheppard’s draft final report.

ICANN posts proposed additional corrections to bylaws

Writes Louis Touton: Over the past several weeks, various technical flaws (omissions, inconsistencies, etc.) to the bylaws have been called to my attention. In response, I have prepared and posted a set of technical corrections that I propose be m…

Writes Louis Touton: Over the past several weeks, various technical flaws (omissions, inconsistencies, etc.) to the bylaws have been called to my attention. In response, I have prepared and posted a set of technical corrections that I propose be made to the bylaws. They are posted at <http://www.icann.org/legal/ proposed-bylaws-corrections-11may03.htm>. The intent is to have the Board consider corrections these at its 2 June 2003 meeting. Any comments on these proposed revisions, or other technical corrections that you are aware of, should be made by sending me an e-mail at <touton@icann.org>.

Country name reservations and their actual use

Alexander Svensson sent a comment about the WIPO2 recommendations to ALAC: ICANN already had to deal with the request by its Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) to reserve country names under the .INFO top level domain. Interestingly, it seems t…

Alexander Svensson sent a comment about the WIPO2 recommendations to ALAC: ICANN already had to deal with the request by its Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) to reserve country names under the .INFO top level domain. Interestingly, it seems that only a small group of governments has put the reserved domain names to use.

The results of a quick series of WHOIS queries are here. Out of 223 country names checked, 202 are simply reserved by ICANN.