.org application process: NCDNHC as a neutral arbiter?

Harold Feld has forwarded a letter from Stuart Lynn to the NCDNHC’s discuss list. In that letter, the ICANN CEO accepts the NCDNHC’s offer to help with the evaluation of the .org bids, and suggests that the NCDNHC should focus on criteria 4, 5, 6 …

Harold Feld has forwarded a letter from Stuart Lynn to the NCDNHC’s discuss list. In that letter, the ICANN CEO accepts the NCDNHC’s offer to help with the evaluation of the .org bids, and suggests that the NCDNHC should focus on criteria 4, 5, 6 of the evaluation process: Differentiation of the .org TLD, Inclusion of mechanisms for promoting the registry’s operation in a manner that is responsive to the needs, concerns, and views of the noncommercial Internet user community, and Level of support for the proposal from .org registrants. What makes this interesting is the GNR proposal which suggests travel funding for the NCDNHC and a .org steering committee in which the NCDNHC’s leadership is supposed to participate. To me, this is a conflict of interests for the NCDNHC. Milton Mueller, who played a key role in drafting the DNSO’s .org policy, disagrees strongly.

Verisign

This interesting notice sent by Verisign to a “valued customer” who wants to leave made it to Declan McCullagh’s politech list and to a variety of other mailing lists. Just in time to provide even more illustration to Bret Fausett’s excellent essa…

This interesting notice sent by Verisign to a “valued customer” who wants to leave made it to Declan McCullagh’s politech list and to a variety of other mailing lists. Just in time to provide even more illustration to Bret Fausett’s excellent essay: If I Were Stratton Sclavos.

OECD to ICANN: Enforce WHOIS provisions.

George Kirikos has sent a pointer to a report about the OECD’s activities with respect to WHOIS accuracy: The organization’s secretary-general has sent a letter to Stuart Lynn (and a copy to the GAC’s chair). In that letter, the OECD points ICANN …

George Kirikos has sent a pointer to a report about the OECD’s activities with respect to WHOIS accuracy: The organization’s secretary-general has sent a letter to Stuart Lynn (and a copy to the GAC’s chair). In that letter, the OECD points ICANN to Ben Edelman’s study of invalid WHOIS entries, and to its own experience with losing ocde.org. ICANN is urged to require the registrars in question, in particular NameScout, to cease sponsoring patently false registrations which they maintain.

In the subsequent discussion on the GA list, Rick Wesson pointed out that [i]t is a completely valid reaction to use inaccurate information in a whois entry to avoid spam/uce and other marketing liturature, I get at lease on peace of junk mail per day sent to addresses listed in a whois database. In a different branch of the discussion, Karl Auerbach suggested that [t]he interests of a few trademark owners is hardly a reason to use a system – DNS whois – that is highly susceptable to false or erroneous data and, when accurate, is a major violation of privacy. In response to this, George Kirikos suggested a “Legal Contact” role (which could be the ISP, Technical Contact, the Registrant, or someone else the Registrant chooses to use) who is held legally responsible for problems originating from a domain, with accurate info that IS in the WHOIS for that contact? I think that’s all people ultimately need to reach, someone who is responsible.

Allan Liska, in response, suggested to just use the domain’s technical contact field for this function. In a follow-up to this message, George Kirikos suggests DMCA-like safe harbour provisions for the person taking this role.

IOSC.LU: An afternoon with Vint Cerf.

Yesterday, I attended ISOC.LU’s afternoon event with Vint Cerf. Actually, Vint was the second speaker: First, Latif Ladid gave a highly entertaining advocacy talk on the need for a transition to IPv6. One of the key points of that talk was the emp…

Yesterday, I attended ISOC.LU‘s afternoon event with Vint Cerf. Actually, Vint was the second speaker: First, Latif Ladid gave a highly entertaining advocacy talk on the need for a transition to IPv6. One of the key points of that talk was the emphasis on an open, end-to-end Internet, as opposed to today’s online world with with dynamic IP addresses, NAT, and similar evils. Vint’s talk (the first part of which was not “corrupted” by Powerpoint slides 😉 began with a short run-down of the Internet’s history, starting in the early ARPANET days. Besides lots of nice anecdotes, his key point was once again openness: Keep the standards open, keep the uses open. Since this was an event organized by ISOC, he also elaborated on the things ISOC chapters could do. In particular, Vint mentioned policy development for the Internet, given that many governments and legislatures are currently making policy for an Internet they may not understand. ICANN and today’s hard policy issues were only touched, though – they did not play a key role in either the talks, or the subsequent panel discussion.

Notes on the other event of the day, the Domain Name summit in Paris, can be found in Robert Shaw’s blog.

???tats g??????aux europ???ns du nommage Internet

It seems like July 4 is packed with Internet-related events in Europe: In Paris, the first ???tats g??????aux europ???ns du nommage Internet will happen, with talks by Alejandro Pisanty and Philip Sheppard. I’m just wondering who’s the Tiers-???tat this time?

It seems like July 4 is packed with Internet-related events in Europe: In Paris, the first ノtats g駭駻aux europ馥ns du nommage Internet will happen, with talks by Alejandro Pisanty and Philip Sheppard. I’m just wondering who’s the Tiers-ノtat this time?