WHOIS Hearing: Testimony available.

The written testimony from yesterday’s WHOIS hearing is now available online: Timothy Trainer, J. Scott Evans, Rick Wesson, Fraudit Info Sheet submitted by Mr. Wesson, Mark Bohannon Rick Wesson, by the way, indeed testified what I thought I heared…

The written testimony from yesterday’s WHOIS hearing is now available online: Timothy Trainer, J. Scott Evans, Rick Wesson, Fraudit Info Sheet submitted by Mr. Wesson, Mark BohannonRick Wesson, by the way, indeed testified what I thought I heared yesterday: I do support the proposed legislation as a step forward and hope it will deter those intent on registering domains with fraudulent contact data. While it might indeed have a deterrent effect, we cannot solely rely on industry regulation to prevent false and invalid registrant data from entering the Whois database. … Please add a requirement that registrars be involved in validating a potentially accurate representation of those they register. Don稚 miss this opportunity to evolve the Internet beyond the wild, wild west toward the safety of any civilized community.

Why people share music instead of buying it.

As Kris K??hntopp points out over and over again, file sharing can give consumers a level of comfort and value that money, unfortunately, can’t buy these days. A friend points me to a great recording of Brahms’ German Requiem (Leinsdorf with the Bo…

As Kris Köhntopp points out over and over again, file sharing can give consumers a level of comfort and value that money, unfortunately, can’t buy these days.A friend points me to a great recording of Brahms’ German Requiem (Leinsdorf with the Boston Symphony). I want to buy that recording as a christmas gift for my father — it’s not available on this side of the Atlantic, I’m told.I order the sound track for Chicago (dozed through the movie on a trans-Atlantc flight some time ago, still want to get the sound track) from Amazon — it’s three weeks and counting now, and I was just told that it may take some more weeks.Add to this Kris’ observation that CDs often come with copy protection mechanisms these days which aren’t effective against determined attackers, but can break players; that digital music is either unavailable legally, or DRMed to the extent that it’s not portable across player platforms (and technology generations); add to this that MP3s are not so encumbered.Then, why on earth, should people pay money to be allowed to wait a month for a product that may quite well be inferior to what’s available almost freely and almost immediately, can be used across platforms, and is available in formats that are suitable for long-time archival?

WHOIS hearing notes

Some preliminary notes from listening to the WHOIS hearing’s live webcast: Testimonial was heared from Tim Trainer (IACC), J Scott Evans (INTA; former GNSO Council member and IPC chair), Rick Wesson (registrar constituency CTO), and Mark Bohannon …

Some preliminary notes from listening to the WHOIS hearing’s live webcast: Testimonial was heared from Tim Trainer (IACC), J Scott Evans (INTA; former GNSO Council member and IPC chair), Rick Wesson (registrar constituency CTO), and Mark Bohannon (Copyright Coalition on Domain Names). All witnesses supported the bill.

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Besides the usual “whois is important” statements, Rick Wesson testified about his fraudit system, and pointed out that registrars have no business incentives to verify contact data supplied to them as long as they are paid. He seemed to suggest that additional lelgislation was needed in order to create such incentives. (I may have mis-heared him on that point, though.)

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J Scott Evans repeatedly said that ICANN efforts on WHOIS accuracy were busy discussing procedure, not substance. I wonder how he came to that conclusion — Task Force 3 is, after all, chaired by a member of the IPC, and (I’m hearing) currently attempting to reach out and collect input on available accuracy verification mechanisms. Outreach seems stalled, though, because relevant contact information is lacking.I’m planning to re-listen to the webcast once it’s available; I may have more then.

Read This.

Susan Crawford has background information on today’s congress hearing: At that hearing, the Subcommittee will be considering a new Whois bill creating new penalties for people who provide false data when registering a domain name. The hearing will…

Susan Crawford has background information on today’s congress hearing: At that hearing, the Subcommittee will be considering a new Whois bill creating new penalties for people who provide false data when registering a domain name.The hearing will be webcast. A witness list is not available.Later: The committee’s schedule page refers to this as an oversight hearing; on the subcommittee’s page, it’s now a legislative hearing on HR 3754 (text here; thanks to Susan Crawford).

Staff Misses Deadline; Council Cancels Call.

The GNSO Council’s call for this week has been cancelled. The call’s purpose would have been to discuss a staff-manager-prepared summary of constituency statements for the new registry-services PDP. That summary has not yet been sent to the counci…

The GNSO Council’s call for this week has been cancelled. The call’s purpose would have been to discuss a staff-manager-prepared summary of constituency statements for the new registry-services PDP. That summary has not yet been sent to the council, but is expected within the next 24 hours, we’re told. The council now plans to discuss this report on February 19.This is turning into an increasingly absurd pattern of staff promises that are then broken. I’m tempted to talk about a systemic failure that began when the new wishful-thinking PDP was adopted during the reform process.

“Where’s that porn coming from, son?”

Spammers cause ever new embarassments. This week-end, we were visiting my parents. Thanks to Apple’s excellent OS X, they are reasonably comfortable with their computer (well, mostly) which mostly serves as a repository for digital photography, an…

Spammers cause ever new embarassments. This week-end, we were visiting my parents. Thanks to Apple’s excellent OS X, they are reasonably comfortable with their computer (well, mostly) which mostly serves as a repository for digital photography, and for exchanging e-mail and instant messages with me. Fortunately, their e-mail addresses haven’t made it onto any spammers’ lists, yet. You can probably imagine my surprise when I was suddenly questioned about some porn they had recently found in their inbox. The solution: This wasn’t porn addressed to them, but a bounce message. Some spammer had, apparently, guessed my father’s e-mail address (<first name>@does-not-exist.org; the first name isn’t that rare), and had been using it as the sender’s address for obscene spam. That spam hadn’t reached the intended recipient, though, but my parents. No, I’m not suggesting that “adult content”, “obscenity”, or whatever you want to call it be banned online. But I don’t want to be asked by my parents where that porn in their inbox comes from, either.In more pleasant news on the spam front, Wired reports that Dutch police have arrested 52 people suspected of being involved with Nigerian scam schemes.