.kids.us about to start.

Alexander Svensson notes that .kids.us is going to be launched on Thursday. He takes a critical look (in German) at some of the questions that a kid-safe domain will have to face: Kid-safe content is a relative notion; a movie that’s R-rated in th…

Alexander Svensson notes that .kids.us is going to be launched on Thursday. He takes a critical look (in German) at some of the questions that a kid-safe domain will have to face: Kid-safe content is a relative notion; a movie that’s R-rated in the US can be considered harmless here. Also, the policies in place in .kids.us are so restrictive that the only content available is non-interactive, static, and un-linked. “Families would probably be better off with a CD-ROM with kid-safe content”, Alexander writes.While the objections are well-taken, I have a problem with his final conclusion, that not delegating .kids in 2000 may have been the best decision ICANN has ever made. On the merits, he’s right. But should ICANN look at these merits? Shouldn’t it have permitted a .kids domain, and let it fail?

.dns

Via CircleID comes a pointer to Bob Frankston’s essay Implementing .DNS: We’re selling numbers. Big numbers and we promise that we’ll never sell the same number twice. The benefits: Stable URLs that don’t suddenly point to unrelated content, and d…

Via CircleID comes a pointer to Bob Frankston’s essay Implementing .DNS: We’re selling numbers. Big numbers and we promise that we’ll never sell the same number twice. The benefits: Stable URLs that don’t suddenly point to unrelated content, and domain names that come without semantic connotations and all the baggage these bring into the game.

Hulk failed because of movie pirates?

The Hulk wasn’t as successful as anticipated due to illegal copies of an early version that made it to the Internet — at least that’s what a report on German TV tonight wanted to make viewers believe, in the context of some IP-perspective reporti…

The Hulk wasn’t as successful as anticipated due to illegal copies of an early version that made it to the Internet — at least that’s what a report on German TV tonight wanted to make viewers believe, in the context of some IP-perspective reporting about our localized version of the DMCA. I don’t buy that propaganda, though: The cinema trailer I saw earlier this year was certainly enough to keep me from watching that film.

Virus writing as a hate crime.

SatireWire , via GrepLaw: 41 U.S. states and six European countries today announced that the act of creating an attachment-based computer virus will now be considered a hate crime because it intentionally targets stupid people. Objections are alle…

SatireWire , via GrepLaw: 41 U.S. states and six European countries today announced that the act of creating an attachment-based computer virus will now be considered a hate crime because it intentionally targets stupid people. Objections are allegedly coming from the ACLU, though: “Hate crime statutes are specifically designed to protect minority groups,” said ACLU President Nadine Strossen. “I’m not sure the number of stupid computer users meets that criterion.”